Saturday, July 28, 2018

Not perfect AT FIRST


Originally published in Rebootology

Are you one of my readers who is going to check this issue of Reboot Your Life to see that I have correct spelling, correct grammar and punctuation? Maybe you are one of the people who write to me and correct my writing…

Do you know that your need to seek perfection is holding you back?

Is this you:

“When I retired in I had time to reflect on my career and how I could have made success come easier. My one complaint was that I felt I had worked too many hours to achieve it. 
After considerable thought, I had a revelation: I was a diehard perfectionist and my perfectionism had doubled the time it took me to be successful!”

Do you treat perfection like a proud war veteran who had been awarded medals. The truth is, those "medals" were a millstone around his neck and were slowing him down. 

I remember being challenged by James Newman, who had come to Australia in the mid eighties to present his seminar “Release Your Brakes” saying to be that:

“It doesn’t need to be perfect… at first!” and in that he gave me permission to be striving for perfection but at the same time being able to accept that 90% was often good enough if you “got it done!”

Is perfectionism keeping you from accomplishing your goals?

Have you ever said anything like: 
"I must find the perfect gift for my sister's wedding."
"This report has to be perfect before I turn it in."
"I have to make sure my presentation is perfect before I meet with this client."

The sad truth is, nothing is perfect. Striving for perfection is foolish - and it's impossible to reach. So trying to make things perfect can prevent you from ever achieving the things you want to accomplish. 

The other nasty thing about perfectionism is that it can stall you - keep you treading water instead of progressing. In other words, if you're always trying to make your novel perfect, you'll never get it published.

Keep in mind that you are a work in progress. So, too, are your goals... works in progress. If you never start on them... you can never benefit from the results.
Beating perfectionism is tough work. And sometimes the very thought that you aren't doing something "perfectly" can stop you in your tracks and stomp on your motivation.
Try This The Slump Buster
If you feel your energy level sliding, or if you are losing your motivation, here's a simple strategy that will help you get back in the game.
Maintain a list of small, meaningful tasks that need doing - things like replacing a light bulb, writing a letter, or returning a phone call. Take out your list when you feel a slump coming on and take care of one of those tasks. You will be out of your slump by the time you have completed it. 
Why? Because you will have "stepped back" to catch your breath. Plus, accomplishing even small tasks is energizing. 

Results are always good! 

When I get those emails chastising me about my spelling, or grammar or punctuation I often reply by saying “They are deliberate errors – did you get the other 3??”

Interestingly, the people who read my emails the most thoroughly, and send me a list of my transgressions, rarely buy from me. I find that strange.

So can I suggest that you keep your perfectionism under control. Please keep in mind "the bigger picture,” and to push to move your goals forward. Can you make this your rule: 90 percent means good to go!

Don't waste time and energy striving for perfect. Do the best you can. Then take time later to fine-tune your work.
#WayneMansfield #Rebootology  #BusinessSeminarsAustralia

1 comment:

  1. yes, to some extent I agree with you, 90% is good to go, yet I still rankle over leaving out a bit of the better stuff from my last novel, why - because my file corroded and I had to leap back to an earlier copy...lol!
    the one I'm presently writing is being held back by an influx of 'mind readers' who hang about trying to read my mind. Apparently writers are the best for them to practice on, because we so often focus on what we do. Forgetting all else. It's put me off writing.

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